Nordic Celebration

Welcome to Nordic Literature week 2019

This year is a very special year, because this year the Nordic Associations in Denmark, Norway and Sweden celebrates the 100th anniversary! We, the Nordic Associations, hope that you will join us in the celebrations, together with the Nordic and Baltic countries, during the Nordic Literature Week 2019.

The 11th -17th of November 2019, the same books will be read aloud across the Nordic and Baltic countries, from Greenland in the west to the Baltic countries in the east. Monday the 11th of November marks The Big Reading Aloud Day. The read aloud for children and youth, Morning Dawn, takes place at 9 AM. Evening Dusk, the read aloud for adults, take place in the evening, at 7 PM. The exact time can of course be adjusted as needed.

There are endless opportunities during the Nordic Literature Week. With this Catalogue of Ideas, we wish to inspire kindergartens, schools, libraries and other cultural institutions to put together an exciting and diverse program during the Nordic Literature Week 2019. The ideas are divided into target groups, i.e. children, youth and adults. We would, nevertheless, like to point out that age is only a number, and that these ideas could potentially provide inspiration to activities for other age groups than the one they were originally intended for.

The annual theme for Nordic Literature Week creates a focal point for the Literature Week and characterizes everything from that year’s books to be read aloud, to the Literature Week’s activities and events. This year's reading books reflect all the theme Nordic Celebration and invite listeners to participate in the literary parties through the magic of the written word. In Pippi Celebrates her Birthday we are invited to a party in Villa Villekulla, where both horse and monkey take a seat at the table. In Sophie's World, we celebrate Sophie's birthday with a philosophical garden-party theme, which offers both coffee, speeches and a touch of surrealism. And in Babette’s Feast, we take place at the table of a French feast, which will be enjoyed until the last bite.

The Nordic Literature Week, with the theme 'Nordic Celebration', wants to highlight community and friendship. With this, we hope that the selected reading books will attract both participants and organizers to a magnificent party to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Nordic Association in Denmark, Norway and Sweden.

Happy reading!

Anna Berg
Projekt Manager

Books

A special thanks to:

Ásdís Eva Hannesdóttir, Brigita Urmanaite, Bror Myllykoski, Eha Vain, Hedvig Solbakken, Heidi Lønne Grønseth, Ieva Hermansone, Julia Brink, Kersti Liiva, Krístin Magnúsdóttir, Lasse Paukkonen, Marjun Patursson, Merete Riber, Mette Lautsen, Nastassia Maiskaya, Pauline Lundblad Abelsen and Bárður Óskarsson.

WIN A BOOK! Photo competition on Instagram and Facebook

Share your experiences from the Nordic Literature Week 2019 and send your best photos to our photo competition.

The photos must reflect this year’s theme, Nordic Celebration, in one way or another. To participate, just upload the photos on Instagram or share them with us on our Facebook page, and tag them with #nordisklitt19. All entries will be considered for the winning price – a book. Let your imagination run wild and take a lot of photographs!

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Reading aloud for children and youth

Morning dawn

The reading aloud for children and youths takes place at dawn. Pippi Celebrates her Birthday is written by the Swedish author Astrid Lindgren and is a real classic for children. The best-selling philosophical youth novel Sophie’s World, written by the Norwegian author Jostein Gaarder, has been selected for reading to young listeners.

The experience surrounding the reading aloud starts before the book has even been opened. By closing the curtains, dimming the lights and lighting a few candles, you can create a captivating atmosphere ahead of the reading. If you have access to a projector, the experience can be enriched by displaying the book’s front cover, this year’s poster from the Nordic Literature Week, or illustrations from the book.

Ideas for children: While reading aloud

Read aloud from above

Capture children's attention by reading aloud from a ladder, an extra tall chair or sitting on a table. Remove other furniture, and let the children sit on cushions and blankets on the floor during the reading.

Co-operate with the local school or library

The Nordic Literature Week creates the perfect opportunity to increase co-operation between schools and libraries. Invite a school-class to come listen to the reading or invite a librarian to do the reading at your school.

Read outside

During the cold and dark November, children and adults stay inside most of the day. Therefore, it could be fun to read aloud outside in the early morning hours. Put on some warm clothes and go find a tree trunk to sit on, some seat pads or the play unit in the schoolyard.

Let the children be co-creators

Interact with the children during the reading and let their opinions and effort play a role. It can, for example, be asking the question "what will Pippi do now?" straight out to the audience during the reading and include this in the story. Or take a break in the reading to play a game or sing a song that fits into the story, based entirely on the children's wishes.

Ideas for children: Activities

Send out an invitation

Reading aloud is an exciting and inclusive activity. Make and send out invitations to someone you would like to join the read aloud event. Invite children from kindergartens or preschools, pupils from a language school or why not grandparents to the read aloud event?

Dive into the book

Work with this year children’s book, Pippi Celebrates her Birthday, both before and after reading it aloud. You could for example study the book’s front cover and discuss what you think the book is about. After having read it aloud, you can discuss what kind of thoughts you had while listening to it, e.g. were there any difficult words?

Play: The gift-giving circle

The game starts with all participants standing in a circle. One person starts by giving the next person in the circle a gift and says, "Here you go, I give you a jumping rope". The recipient receives the gift and makes a demonstration of the gift and thereafter gives a new gift to the next person. The game ends when everyone in the circle has gotten a gift.

Listen and draw

Find pens and papers and let the the children make their owns drawings of Pippi’s birthday party or their own party. Put the drawings on the wall of the classroom and make an exhibition during the Nordic Literature Week.

Focus on the Nordic countries

Use the Nordic Literature Week as an opportunity to showcase and learn more about the Nordic countries. What do their flags look like, what are the names of their capitals, and what are their national animals? You can find a Nordic quiz on our website, www.nordisklitteratur.org.

Nordic corner in the library

Create a Nordic corner with Nordic books about celebrations. Put up this year’s poster and put this year’s literature, alongside other Nordic literature, e.g. from the Nordic Literature Week’s list of additional reading. Find material for visiting kids so they can draw or paint the theme Nordic Celebration, and then make the drawings part of the exhibition.

Use the teaching portal Norden i Skolen

Norden i Skolen is a free teaching portal for Nordic teachers and pupils who want to work with themes such as language and culture, and/or climate change and natural sciences. Create an account on www.nordeniskolen.org and get access to a variety of free teaching material that you can make use of during the Nordic Literature Week. Please note that the materials are available in all the Nordic languages, though not in English.

Ideas for youth: While reading aloud

Read aloud for each other

Use the Nordic Literature Week as an opportunity to focus on reading aloud. Ask for volunteers in the class to read aloud parts of the extract from Sophie’s World to the rest of the class.

Co-operate with the local school or library

The Nordic Literature Week creates the perfect opportunity to increase co-operation between schools and libraries. Invite a school class to come listen to the reading or invite a librarian to do the reading at your school.

Read for a Nordic Friendship Class

Collaborate with a Nordic Friendship class and read alternately for each other. Or maybe you can record the text and share it with each other? Can you understand the language of your friendship class? Afterwards, you can discuss the text with each other. Do you exprience the language the same way? Can you recognise anything from your home country in the text? Please note that this might be more relevant for participants in the Nordic Countries.

Find a Nordic Friendship Class at nordeniskolan.org!

Ideas for youth: Activities

Writing workshop

Do any of the young listeners perhaps possess a hidden writing talent? Invite an author over to do a writing workshop with the future talents. How about ending the Nordic Literature Week by reading the stories of the teenagers’ own literary stories?

Read aloud group

Gather a few students to create a read aloud group and go around the school or library with a book in your hand. Spread literature and let the teenagers read aloud for the younger kids. If anyone is extra brave, they can read aloud for an entire class.

Read aloud with a spectrum of moods

Write down different types of moods on individual notes (e.g. hysterical, happy, scared, nervous, angry…) and put the notes in a box. The students will then pull each note out of the box and read aloud from the read aloud text to the others with the mood that is written on the note. How many moods does it takes to finish the text?

Study the Nordic languages

An extract from the book, Sophie’s World, is available in all the Nordic languages on the website of the Nordic Literature Week. Combine the read aloud with a study session about the Nordic languages, and if you are really brave, you can read the extract in another Nordic language. If you have students studying a Nordic language, you can have them practice translating the extract from English into the language they are studying, and then they can compare it to the translated version on the website.

Dive into the text

Ask the young listeners to write a summary of the text extract and discuss the linguistic characteristics and the figures of speech they noticed. Alternatively, the students can read the extract themselves and choose a sentence that moves them in some way. Then, divide the students into groups to discuss which thoughts pop into their heads. What makes these very sentences interesting?

The importance of celebration

The garden party in Sofie's world is celebrated in connection with the seasonal celebration midsummer and the religious celebration confirmation. Discuss in groups how celebrations and parties can affect one's personal development, identity and what role they have for cycles of life and nature.

Use the teaching portal Norden i Skolen

Norden i Skolen is a free teaching portal for Nordic teachers and pupils who want to work with themes such as language and culture, and/or climate change and natural sciences. Create an account on www.nordeniskolen.org and get access to a variety of free teaching material that you can make use of during the Nordic Literature Week. Please note that the materials are available in all the Nordic languages, though not in English.

Reading out loud for adults

Evening dusk

Evening dusk is the reading aloud session for adults. It takes place when the November darkness has set in. This year’s book is the novel Babette’s Feast written by the Danish author Karen Blixen (under the pseudonym Isak Dinesen).

The experience surrounding the reading aloud starts before the book has even been opened; by closing the curtains, dimming the lights and lighting a few candles, you can create a captivating atmosphere ahead of the reading.

Ideas for adults

Combine the reading aloud session with other activities at the libraries

Do you arrange language-cafés for immigrants, reading aloud sessions for children, knitting-cafés or book-clubs at the library? Read aloud from this year’s books or from any other Nordic literature and combine these already existing events with the Nordic Literature week and take part of the grand reading aloud community from 11th to 17th of November 2019.

Nordic tunes

Nordic music can be a nice addition to the reading aloud event. Organize a small concert with some Nordic musicians or make a sing-along with famous Nordic songs.

“Pop-up” reading

Spread the joy of reading aloud during the Nordic Literature Week. Invite drama students or the local theatre to co-operate on “pop-up reading” around town. Bring a book, go to different streets, squares and/or parks etc., and read aloud in the places where people expect it the least. You can light a torch in the dusk for added effect.

Invite an author

Combine the reading aloud with a visit from an author. You could perhaps get an author nominated for the Nordic Council’s Literature Prize to visit you, or the Nordic Council’s Children’s and Youth Prize.

Nordic Feast

Invite guests, students or bypassers to a hyggelig (nice and cosy) evening with Nordic food. How about trying Norwegian rømmegrøt, Danish smørrebrød or Karelian pasties from Finland?

Book exchange day

Sustainability and climate changes are both important and present themes. What about arranging a book exchange at the school or at the library during the Nordic Literature week? Bring the books you have already read and pass them on to other people to enjoy.

Nordic Celebration

This year’s work of art

This year's artwork is created by the Faroese children's book author and artist Bárður Óskarsson. Bárður, who was born and raised in Torshavn, Faroe Islands, has lived in Copenhagen, Denmark, for the past 30 years. He won the Nordic Council's Children's and Youth Literature Prize 2018 for the picture book 'Træið', which he himself wrote and illustrated.

Feel free to download the poster from www.nordisklitteratur.org and use the poster to inform about your Morning Dawn or Evening Dusk event. Put up the poster on message boards, let it illustrate invitations online, newsletters, e-mails, social media or send it out by traditional mail. You can also use the poster to decorate the entrance and rooms of your Nordic Literature Week event.

Download the poster

Dive into this year’s poster

Description and interpretation

Print the poster or show it with a projector on the wall. What does the poster represent? What techniques dominates the illustration and how does the colouring compliment the shape of it? Do you find symbols and characters in the picture? Describe the image with all the details and give your image of the image.

What histories hides within the poster?

Have a look at the poster and let it be an inspiration for further descriptions and stories. The stories could either be presented in written or oral form.